Monthly Archives: May 2014

Art is What You Make of It

Susan Wilks & Tony Healy,  Art is What You Make of It (Hawker-Brownlow, 2012)

The arts perform a vital role in the growth of human consciousness because they create sensory experiences and help the development of perception and aesthetic awareness. If we use the exploration of social and cultural contexts as the framework for developing visual arts curricula, then the nature of learning experiences will be much more diverse. Art Is What You Make of It assists teachers to engage their students, from the middle years and beyond, in the exploration of complex issues presented by artworks of both contemporary and past eras. The term “artworks” here encompasses all aspects of the fine arts, design and digital media. The scenarios and examples in the book examine the blurring of boundaries between art forms; art which is ephemeral or which exists only in photographic, technological or other forms of information storage; and art that seems to deliberately set out to upset or offend the viewing public. The scenarios and information in Art Is What You Make of It offer fruitful and stimulating starting points for inquiry, and assist in the development of a better understanding and appreciation of art’s diversity and complexity. The issues raised and the discussions that stem from this book can lead to exploration of issues that range across disciplines and year levels.

[fancy_link title=”Visit the seller’s page” style=”fancy-link” color=”fapsablue” link=”http://www.hbe.com.au/art-is-what-you-make-of-it.html”]

Social Reconstruction Learning Jennifer Bleazby, Social Reconstruction Learning

Social Reconstruction Learning

Jennifer Bleazby, Social Reconstruction Learning

This volume argues that educational problems have their basis in an ideology of binary opposites often referred to as dualism, which is deeply embedded in all aspects of Western society and philosophy, and that it is partly because mainstream schooling incorporates dualism that it is unable to facilitate the thinking skills, dispositions and understandings necessary for autonomy, democratic citizenship and leading a meaningful life. Drawing on the philosophy of John Dewey, feminist pragmatism, Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children program, and the service learning movement, Bleazby proposes an approach to schooling termed “social reconstruction learning,” in which students engage in philosophical inquiries with members of their community in order to reconstruct real social problems, arguing that this pedagogy can better facilitate independent thinking, imaginativeness, emotional intelligence, autonomy, and active citizenship.

[fancy_link title=”Visit the seller’s page” style=”fancy-link” color=”fapsablue” link=”http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415636247/”]